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Pla¥


bronze, ⌀150 x d4,5 cm. 


Odense City Sculpture Triennial, 2021



A gigantic bronze coin with a shiny, golden surface stands upright, pressed down into the grass and soil of the park – as if a giant had had the coin in its hand, and tried to stick it into the earth in a stupid attempt to give nature back its minerals – or as if the earth itself was a slot machine.

   The work submits itself to the discussion of a number of anthropogenic issues, such as the conversion of natural resources into profit, which won’t be able to be exchanged, as well as a societal and technological development whose only global concord seems to be growth.

   The front of the coin presents a sort of tree of life or fertility goddess with her head surrounded by different kinds of wildlife. The character of the figure is erotic, which reflects the comprehensive force of attraction in kingdom of plants and animals, as well as a human desire in the guise of a naked female body.

    Unlike the heteronormative view on gender and sexuality dominating most of society, wild nature makes up an endlessly broad spectrum for sex, gender, reproduction and symbiotic relationships, like the hermaphroditism of snails and plants, or the co-existence across different species such as lichen, which is a mix between fungi and algae.

   

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The back of the coin presents some kind of trickster – a dancing jellyfish with four eyes. According to the theory on The Rise of Slime (Jeremy Jackson, 2008), in the future, as a consequence of oxygen depletion, climate change, overfishing and pollution, it will only be the most primitive organisms, like jellyfish, algae and bacteria, who will be capable of living in the oceans.

   The extinction of the diverse marine life, that has emerged through many millions of years of evolution, will have fatal consequences for the life on earth, which is so deeply dependent of – and symbiotically connected with – the ecosystems of the sea.

   Thus, the two-parted shape of the work contains different narratives. On one side, it contemplates being viewed in the shadow of human actions. On the other side, it can be viewed as a kind of tree of life, in a mythological as well as a biological sense. Furthermore, the coin appeals to something semiotically incorporated in modern human beings – a sort of archetypical symbol of wealth, luck, or growth, to which the opportunistic part of consciousness is automatically drawn. Like that, the coin in its gigantic shape can be seen as a materialization of human desire, and a symbolic redistribution of this vital force, down into the earth and out in the planetary.  


Pla¥ has been realized with support from the Danish Arts Foundation and Grosserer L.F. Foghts Fond


Press: Weekendavisen

 

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3reproduction
4reproduction
11reproduction
13re.prʘductiʘn
15re.prʘductiʘn
20re.prʘductiʘn

re:prʘductiʘn looks into natural processes, like sex, reproduction and symbiosis, from both a human and non-human perspective.

 

On the roof of an old cooling tower, a neon sign with bright colors signifies that the building has been given a new life. The sign is inspired by various species of lichen – a composite organism made up of fungi living in a symbiotic relationship with algae. 

 

The discovery of how lichen is composed of both mushroom and algae (Simon Schwendener 1867) led to the term symbiosis (Albert Frank 1877). 

 

While algae draw energy from sunlight (photosynthesis), mushroom feeds on other organisms (living or dead), and is taxonomically more comparable to animals than plants. With lichen covering 7-8 % of the planet’s surface, it’s a most common and evident example of symbiosis between species of radical different natures. 

 

The neon sign atop of the building attempts to give these exemplary organisms attention, at the same time it alludes to sex shops and advertisements found in major cities. 

 

The inside of the cooling tower can be viewed through peepholes in the walls. In there, wooden sculptures, depicting overgrown amphibians, dwell in the mud. Like the building itself, the sculptures are being eaten by organisms transforming dead material into new growth. Different species of fungi grow out of the sculptures. The fungi are kept damp by steam, billowing from a plateau in the middle of the room. On top of the plateau lies a flower made of sugar and isomalt. Like the stamens of real flowers, the sculpture attracts various insects, but in contrast to the pollination, which typically takes place between flowers and bees, the sculpture makes no contribution to reproduction in nature. On the contrary, it acts as a kind of false nectar, that robs nature’s real flowers of the possibility of being pollinated, since the insects will be more attracted to the artificial sugar flower. 

 

During the exhibition period, re:prʘductiʘn will become a breeding ground for non-human life forms and human fantasies alike.

 

 

re:prʘductiʘn is supportet by the Danish Arts Foundation.

 

re:prʘductiʘn is part of the group show ‘Bubbles – an art route through the city’, with studio collective 51cth, organized by Museum of Contemporary Art, Roskilde.


Press: Ofluxo, Tzvetnik

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re:prʘductiʘn, work proces and thoughts 


Video: Troels Kahl · Editing: Troels Kahl + Anders Obbekjær


re:prʘductiʘn is part of the group show Bubbles, with 51cth and Museum of Contemporary art, May 2021


(re)prʘductiʘn is supportet by the Danish Arts Foundation

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Klubben

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 contribution for Texted (Danish)

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1lym
5lym
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14lym
17lym


Love Your Monsters

Shabu Shabu (Anders Brinch & Silas Inoue).
Marie Kirkegaard Gallery - April 9 through May 15  2021.


Marie Kirkegaard is pleased to welcoming you to the exhibition Love Your Monsters by Shabu Shabu, the artist duo Silas Inoue and Anders Brinch. Love Your Monsters is an ambitious exhibition project first presented at Store Tårn on Christiansø in June-October 2020. Now the exhibition has finally been new-installed, translated and transformed to our gallery space.
 
                                                                                Text by Nanna Stjernholm

A strange world of monstrous creatures and willful technologies emerges and takes over the gallery space converting it into an otherworldly ecosystem. A lush canopy of long strings of handmade ceramic beads hang from the ceiling like outstretched, mutated DNA strings. The spherical shape of the ceramic beads multiplies itself throughout the exhibition in a myriad of acrylic globes. The transparent spheres are almost like micro-versions of the exhibition itself: Small universes wrapped in dew drops or in cell-like bubbles, populated by tiny creatures, plastic fragments and plant parts in multiple sealed microcosms.        

Love Your Monsters is an expedition into a mutated wilderness, both ancient and futuristic, where monsters and humans are not opposites. Rather, they both grow out of the same caring and attentive scenario, which spreads across the gallery.
 
Almost like small planets or satellites – or even escape pods from space ships – these spheres are suspended in the gallery room as part of the intricate network made up of the strings of pearls and the many wires connecting all the works in the exhibition. Together they form a chaotic grid structure in which all entities of the exhibition – terrestrial as well as extra-terrestrial, biological as well as technological, organisms as well as ideas – are intertwined, part of one polyphonic whole.
 
The exhibition draws its title from the 2012 essay Love Your Monsters by French philosopher Bruno Latour. He views Mary Shelley's classic gothic novel Frankenstein (1818) as an image of one of the biggest flaws of modern human society: We have not been able to give proper care or attention to our own technological inventions. The problem is not Dr. Frankenstein's monster itself. Rather, it is the doctor's lack of caring for his creature, which has ostracised it from society thus making it a monster in the first place. In the exhibition the boundaries between manmade culture and what we conventionally call nature, collapse and show us that nature contains culture just as culture contains nature.
 
Love Your Monsters imagines a world where humans, nature and technology nurtures each other and coexists in ecosystems yet unknown to us; where robots mix with giant humanoid jellyfish and hundreds of growths and life forms as a reminder of the monstrous that lives within us. The exhibition is an echo from the future, but whether its message is one of hopeful prosperity or a vaguely apocalyptic chaos remains uncertain.
 
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Love Your Monsters is the fourth exhibition where Anders Brinch (b. 1971) and Silas Inoue (b. 1981) collaborate under the name Shabu Shabu, which is also the name of a traditional Japanese fondue dish – a social dish where you combine, cook and eat the food together. The idea behind Shabu Shabu is that of an artistic” hotpot” – a platform where various ideas and experiments are tried out in different locations and constellation. The realization of the exhibition project in Store Tårn on Christiansø has been made with the generous support from Statens Kunstfond, Statens Værksteder, Sparekassen Bornholms Fond and Christiansø Administration.


2018 - 2019 - 2020