Future Friture - l∞p,


Enter Art fair, 27 - 30 August, represented by Marie Kirkegaard Gallery,


It is speculated that, sometime in the future, eternal life can be achieved in a virtual world by uploading the consciousness into the cloud. The video work animates such a digital afterlife. A disassembled computer sunken into cooking oil (similar to the technology used by datacenters to save energy) is used as media player for an eternal upward movement into the skies, referencing both religious ideas of the afterlife and cloud computing.


Animation by Ben Wheele.

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politikken

eat & becʘ̃me


Augustiana Kunsthal - Sønderborg, 17th July – 20 September 2020


Silas Inoue’s praxis is based on an idiosyncratic approach to nature and humanity – and how these concepts are deeply intertwined. The exhibition eat & becʘ̃me deals with the state of dependence between humans, and the provisions that nature provides us with. A physical necessity, that is cultivated by man, and today has become a symbolic phrase: you become, what you eat.

 

In his work with drawing, sculpture and installation, Inoue combines analytical world observations with intuitive and imaginative expressions. He describes the style as quasi-Asian, referring to his own part eastern part western origin. The sculptural works often contain food products, and touch upon themes such as evolution, growth and decay. On the occasion of the exhibition, Inoue has thought about the nutritional aspects of his practice, as well as how consumption correlates with becoming.


The work series Infrastructure can be seen as an analogy to the increase of population in the metropolises. The inner compositions resemble imaginary cityscapes, inhabited by bacteria and viruses, together with hundreds of different fungal species, and limited by the acrylic glass tanks that hermetically surround them. Their myceliumfibers give rise to millions of fungal spores, like individuals in a microcosm. On top of the tanks, bronze respiratory systems are placed, which by means of filters add air to the organisms, while preventing the spores and mycotoxins from entering the outside space. Similarly to the infrastructure of society and the human body, the works submit themselves to the microbes living inside them.

 

A similar kind of microculture is at stake in the work SymbioSoup. This is a combined sculptural and performative work, whose title points to the theory of symbiogenesis. Symbiogenesis literally means becoming by living together, and refers to the pivotal role, that symbiosis have played in the evolution of life. The work comes about in the social gathering that evolves around a pot of soup, served at the exhibition opening. Here, the guests are encouraged to donate the leftovers in their soup bowl to the sculpture. The purpose is that the individual bacterial flora of each guest will collectively form unpredictable colonies, reproducing and growing throughout the exhibition period.


In the Future Friture series, large quantities of sugar are melted into a hard candy mass, subsequently used as sculptural material, and sunken into cooking oil. The sculptural works represent the Hydra-organism, as well as the small jellyfish Turritopsis Dohrnii, whose rather special life cycle consists in regenerating itself. Still, this particular ability is a scientific area of interest, and the work also refers to our constant yearning for immortality. The cooking oil preserves the sugar sculptures – but also points out the duality, that lies in the continuance of the oil and sugar, in relation to their degenerative effects on the human body.


The human diet is connected to our evolutionary advance. Way back when we went from subsisting on vegetables to eating meat, we developed bigger brains, and later, when we learned how to prepare food under heating, we developed the cognitive capacities that we have today. At the same time, our culture around food has become concurrent for how we progress, on an individual, health-related level as well as in a longer, evolutionary perspective. The way in which we produce, distribute and consume food products is decisive for what kind of world we create.


The exhibition is realized with support from The Danish Art Foundation


Press: Jyllands-Posten, Idoart, Tzvetnik, Kunsten.nu, Ofluxo, Politiken

               

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eat & becʘ̃me


Huset for Kunst og Design - Holstebro, 15th May - 28th June 2020


Silas Inoue’s praxis is based on an idiosyncratic approach to nature and humanity – and how these concepts are deeply intertwined. The exhibition eat & becʘ̃me deals with the state of dependence between humans, and the provisions that nature provides us with. A physical necessity, that is cultivated by man, and today has become a symbolic phrase: you become, what you eat.

 

In his work with drawing, sculpture and installation, Inoue combines analytical world observations with intuitive and imaginative expressions. He describes the style as quasi-Asian, referring to his own part eastern part western origin. The sculptural works often contain food products, and touch upon themes such as evolution, growth and decay. On the occasion of the exhibition, Inoue has thought about the nutritional aspects of his practice, as well as how consumption correlates with becoming.


The work series Infrastructure can be seen as an analogy to the increase of population in the metropolises. The inner compositions resemble imaginary cityscapes, inhabited by bacteria and viruses, together with hundreds of different fungal species, and limited by the acrylic glass tanks that hermetically surround them. Their myceliumfibers give rise to millions of fungal spores, like individuals in a microcosm. On top of the tanks, bronze respiratory systems are placed, which by means of filters add air to the organisms, while preventing the spores and mycotoxins from entering the outside space. Similarly to the infrastructure of society and the human body, the works submit themselves to the microbes living inside them.

 

A similar kind of microculture is at stake in the work SymbioSoup. This is a combined sculptural and performative work, whose title points to the theory of symbiogenesis. Symbiogenesis literally means becoming by living together, and refers to the pivotal role, that symbiosis have played in the evolution of life. The work comes about in the social gathering that evolves around a pot of soup, served at the exhibition opening. Here, the guests are encouraged to donate the leftovers in their soup bowl to the sculpture. The purpose is that the individual bacterial flora of each guest will collectively form unpredictable colonies, reproducing and growing throughout the exhibition period.


In the Future Friture series, large quantities of sugar are melted into a hard candy mass, subsequently used as sculptural material, and sunken into cooking oil. The sculptural works represent the Hydra-organism, as well as the small jellyfish Turritopsis Dohrnii, whose rather special life cycle consists in regenerating itself. Still, this particular ability is a scientific area of interest, and the work also refers to our constant yearning for immortality. The cooking oil preserves the sugar sculptures – but also points out the duality, that lies in the continuance of the oil and sugar, in relation to their degenerative effects on the human body.


The human diet is connected to our evolutionary advance. Way back when we went from subsisting on vegetables to eating meat, we developed bigger brains, and later, when we learned how to prepare food under heating, we developed the cognitive capacities that we have today. At the same time, our culture around food has become concurrent for how we progress, on an individual, health-related level as well as in a longer, evolutionary perspective. The way in which we produce, distribute and consume food products is decisive for what kind of world we create.


The exhibition is realized with support from The Danish Art Foundation


Press: kunsten.nuidoart.dk

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Love Your Monsters

Shabu Shabu (Anders Brinch & Silas Inoue).
Store Tårn, Christiansø, Danmark - 13 juni til 18 oktober 2020.

 

I et fyrtårn, en del af en gammel søfæstning på den alleryderste kant af Danmark, vokser en sær verden frem, fuld af monstrøse skabninger, egenrådig teknologi og utæmmede planter, der spirer vildt og forgrener sig ud i tårnets runde rum. Lange perlerækker hænger fra loftet, som udstrakte, muterede dna-strenge. De mange hundrede perler er håndlavet i brændt keramik. Perlestrengene spænder rummet ud og understreger det totalgreb, der har overtaget tårnet. Kugleformen multiplicerer sig gennem udstillingen i et utal af akrylkugler. De transparente sfærer er er en slags mikroversioner af selve udstillingen: Et lille univers foldet ind i en dugdråbe eller cellelignende boble, der bebos af små væsener, emballage, plastikfragmenter og plantedele i et forseglet økosystem.

 

Love Your Monsters er en opdagelsesrejse ind i en muteret natur, en fortidig eller fremtidig postapokalypse, hvor monster og menneske ikke er hinandens modsætninger. Udstillingen er lavet af kunstnerduoen Shabu Shabu, der består af Anders Brinch og Silas Inoue, som sammen har skabt en totalinstallation, der gror frem som et omsorgsfuldt scenarie i udstillingslokalet i Store Tårn på Christiansø.

 

Udstillingens titel er hentet fra den franske filosof Bruno Latours essay Love Your Monsters (2012), hvor han ser Mary Shellys gotiske klassiker Frankenstein (1818) som et billede på det moderne menneskes største fejltagelse: at vi ikke har forstået at drage en opmærksom omsorg for vores teknologiske frembringelser. Det er ikke Dr. Frankensteins monster i sig selv, der er problemet – men derimod doktorens manglende omsorg for sin skabning, der udgrænser den fra samfundet og overhovedet gør den til et monster.

 

Med en hilsen til Frankenstein nuancerer Latour sin modernitetskritik, hvori han opløser distinktionerne mellem natur og kultur, mellem videnskab og tro, mellem tingen og mennesket og erklærer at mennesket aldrig har været moderne. Det er Dr. Frankensteins monster et udtryk for, forstået på den vis, at vi siden industrialiseringen ikke har erkendt at naturen også findes i os selv. I udstillingen er grænsen mellem, hvad der er menneskeskabt kultur og det vi kalder natur, faldet sammen og bekræfter Latour i, at der er natur i kulturen og omvendt.

 

Bruno Latour afviser tanken om, at mennesket kan adskille sig fra naturen gennem teknologi og hævder i stedet, at vi bliver draget mere og mere ind i de økosystemer, der understøtter os. Men sammenblandingen af natur og teknologi er ikke noget dårligt, måske snarere noget vi bør dyrke og respektere. Når vi udforsker det ukendte, skriver Latour, må vi hele tiden forvente det uventede.

 

Det er netop den stemning der sættes i tårnrummet på Christiansø, hvor ukendte skabninger og kultiveret såvel som mere vildtvoksende plantevækster spirer under tårnets store glastag. Rundt omkring i landskabet hænger en art af androide væsener. En gren udgør ét af væsenernes krop, som hænger hjælpeløst ned fra loftet, andre igen er lavet i latex. Deres 3D-printede hoveder snapper og vibrerer i den tomme luft. Efterladte skabninger, der ubehjælpsomt sidder fast i deres forprogrammerede animation af det vi kender som liv. Måske et ekko fra fremtiden. Men om det androide væsen er et varsel om forhåbningsfulde tider eller et mildt apokalyptisk kaos er uvist.                       


Et fire meter stort goplelignende væsen tårner sig op og er blandt de få værker i udstillingen, der er placeret på gulvet. Goplevæsnet vækker samme uvished som de snappende androider. Det rækker både frem i tiden og peger tilbage i historien som et mytisk urvæsen. Der har eksisteret gopler på jorden i over 500 millioner år og arten vil med stor sandsynlighed overleve menneskeheden. Deres tilstedeværelse i udstillingen er med til at kollapse vores lineære tidsbegreb og dermed også forestillingen om progression. Det er snarere figurer og scenarier vi kan bruge til at tænke med og forestille os mere forbundne og cykliske alternativer. 

 

Udstillingen Love Your Monsters kan derfor også ses i relation til et begreb biolog og filosof Donna Haraway har beskrevet som andetsteder. Andetsteder skal forstås, som et ønske om at blive ved med at skabe verdener og steder for alternative fortællinger. Hvor man må elske det fremmede, monsteret, i sig selv, for at kunne skabe nye fremtidsscenarier. Scenarier, hvor det ikke længere giver mening at skelne mellem kultur og natur, teknologi og menneske etc. men som er ”lige så fulde af død som de er af liv, lige så fulde af afslutninger, selv af massemord, som de er af begyndelser”, som Haraway skriver. På samme måde som Haraway ønsker at skabe nye flerartede fortællinger er udstillingen Love your Monsters et forsøg på at artikulere og udfordre de historiske kræfter, der former den posthumane og teknovidenskabelige verden.

 

Udstillingens måde at skabe forskydninger i de gængse fortælleformer om relationen mellem bl.a. menneske, natur og teknologi skaber et mangfoldigt og forhåbningsfuldt landskab - og langt fra en utopisk eventyrfortælling. Silas Inoue og Anders Brinch påpeger derimod, at det vi føler os fremmedgjort overfor, fx natur og teknologi, ikke kan skrives ud af vores fortællinger – og må ikke stigmatiseres eller marginaliseres, som Dr. Frankenstein gjorde med sit monster. 

 

Love Your Monsters er en forestilling om en verden, hvor menneske, natur og teknologi nærer hinanden og sameksisterer i endnu ukendte økosystemer. Her blander robotter sig med menneskelignende kæmpegopler og hundredvis af vækster, der for en stund har taget bolig i Store Tårn på Christiansø – som en påmindelse om, at det monstrøse lever i os selv.

                                                                                                                                                                    

 

 

 

Dette er tredje udstilling hvor Anders Brinch & Silas Inoue samarbejder under navnet Shabu Shabu, der også er navnet på en traditionel japansk fondueret – en social ret som man sammensætter, tilbereder og spiser sammen. Ideen med Shabu Shabu er netop en form for kunstnerisk ”hotpot” – en ikke-fastdefineret platform, hvor forskellige ideer og eksperimenter kan afprøves i skiftende lokaliteter og konstellationer af udstillinger.


Tekst af: Nanna Stjernholm


Udstillingen er støttet af: Statens Kunstfond, Statens Værksteder for Kunst, Sparekassen Bornholms Fond





Presse: kunsten.nu, Bornholms Tidende

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eat & becʘ̃me, exhibition conversation (in Danish) with curator Anna Bak and art critic Louise Steiwer.

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Wa(l)king Copenhagen


20th May 2020


12 hours walk (with performative works) through Copenhagen and suburbs – initiated by Metropolis, in collaboration with Copenhagen Contemporary 

 

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På Christiansø er en helt speciel oplevelse begåe (e79f5315)_Side_3
Love Your Monsters (e79f531c)
På Christiansø er en helt speciel oplevelse begåe (e79f5315)_Side_1
På Christiansø er en helt speciel oplevelse begåe (e79f5315)_Side_2


Shabu ShabuBornholms Tidende, Morten Østergaard Møller 



 

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Residency at Danish Art workshops February and March 2020, with Anders Brinch · a Shabu Shabu colaboration

Love Your Monsters at Store Tårn · Christiansø · opening 18th April 2020.



 

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l∞p at TABLEAU CPH, feature in kunsten.nu and idoart.dk

 

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Silas Inoue´s exhibition l∞p at TABLEAU presents a sticky, yet mesmerizing aesthetic of immortality, situated in an undetermined stage between biology, technology and religion.

 

For a long time, the idea of immortality has occupied man – ever since the earliest religions, to the present day, where rapidly growing technologies make prospects of eternal life seem plausible. Influenced by our yearnings and fears of the infinite, the exhibition wavers between bliss and existential claustrophobia. Sugar-made organisms as well as disassembled computers are sunken into cooking oil, and animated deities intertwine with TABLEAU’s ritualistic flower arrangements, specifically made for the exhibition.

 

TABLEAU and Silas Inoue both incorporate in their work the concept of life and growing organisms. Working with flowers is ephemeral while Inoue’s focuses on the concept of immortality. In that way, the artist’s work and TABLEAU’s universe resonate.


Inoue’s Future Friture series depicts enlarged miniature organisms such as the freshwater Cnidarian ‘Hydra’ and the jellyfish ‘Turritopsis dohrnii’. While the first inhabits temperate and tropical regions over the world, the second lives in the Mediterranean and Japanese sea. In nature, these organisms have a rather special life cycle; they revert into an immature state only to grow old again later on in a continuous process. This alternation between old and young is making them somehow immortal – a phenomenon which for long has occupied researchers in the field of regeneration studies.

 

In the video work World Pop Drummer, a demonic creature is beating the drum in an irregular rhythm. The animation is WiFi-connected, and the rhythm is actually based on a statistical estimate of the increasing world population, calculated by deducting the birthrate from the significantly lower death rate. This means that every drumbeat represents an additional human life on the planet. Thus, the work draws rhythmic attention to a rapidly growing world population, and a resource scarcity that opposes the individual's desire for immortality.

 

It is speculated that, sometime in the future, eternal life can be achieved in a virtual world by uploading the consciousness into the cloud. The video work Forever Friture animates such a digital afterlife. A disassembled computer sunken into cooking oil (similar to the technology used by datacenters to save energy) is used as media player for an eternal upward movement into the skies, referencing both religious ideas of the afterlife and cloud computing.


Inoue's work is based on an idiosyncratic approach to nature and humanity – concepts that he considers inseparable. In his drawings, videos, sculptures and installations, he combines analytical observations of the world with intuition and figments of imagination. He describes the style as “quasi-Asian”, with reference to his half eastern and half western origin. The concept of l∞p is according to Inoue “like a snake eating its own tail – a fantasy of self-preservation in the age of ecological collapse and pending catastrophes.” 



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World Pop Drummer and Forever Friture has been animated by Ben Wheele


The exhibition is supported by: Grosserer L.F. Foghts Fond, The Danish Arts Foundation, and The Council for Visual Artists for the City of Copenhagen